Moschino’s Fright Night

Do you like scary movies and resort wear lines?

As each Moschino collection breaks the internet, designer Jeremy Scott turned to All Hallows’ Eve for inspiration for the brand’s Resort Wear 2020 collection released back in the summer. Of course, Moschino is not the first fashion house to find inspiration in things that go bump in the night. 2019 saw cult horror nods from everyone from Prada (Bride of Frankenstein prints and Wednesday Addams plaits) to Undercover (Suspiria emblazoned overcoats) citing inspiration from the genre. Horror and fashion are becoming increasingly intertwined with the genre influencing everything from blood-soaked runways to garish garments.

Undercover Fall 2019 RTW
Undercover Fall 2019 RTW

The collection features many classic Halloween trick-or-treater tropes such as conical witches hat, capes, plastic masks and devil horns. Under the genre-heavy styling lie a collection of loud party dresses, clean tailoring and throw-back prints. These designs are not meant to form a cohesive design story but do complement and juxtapose each other harmoniously like delving into a well-stocked fancy dress box.

Screen Shot 2019-06-16 at 22.01.18
Photo: Marco Ovando / Courtesy of Moschino

Jeremy Scott is not shy of EXCESS and this collection oozes with Instagram-ready looks, overt pop-culture references & tongue-in-cheek humour. Whilst some may feel Scott relies too heavily on stylistic pastiche, personally, I always look forward to watching a Moschino runway. Not content on his tribute to things that go bump in the night, Scott went one step further and staged his very own scary movie.

Opening with a homage to Scream (1996) and that cream ribbed sweater (forever in infamy, thanks to Casey Becker played by baby-faced Drew Barrymore), the runway kicked into full gear with an army of masked spooks. Naturally, things finished off with an en-masse zombie stagger through the Universal Studios backlots.

Homages to kitsch Scream Queen style staples like the maribou trimmed bed jackets are some of the most successful looks on the catwalk. Sugary-sweet babydolls as outerwear instantly bring to mind Valley of the Dolls (1967) drug-fuelled psychedelic slayings with stacked pastel Mary-Jane creepers. I’ll take one in every colour, please.

Turn of the century fancy dress costumes were recreated in bright jelly-bean shades in co-ordinating separates and overalls. Stylised Halloween inspired shapes like crescent moons, stars, fangs and Frankenstein stitches are dotted throughout the collection.

Clear slick blood-red pea-coats are complimented by jaunty bat wing hats. Patterns are bold, in childlike technicolour with graphic monster and ghouls emblazoned on everything from blazers to Day-Glo backpacks.

Screen Shot 2019-06-16 at 22.00.09
Photo: Marco Ovando / Courtesy of Moschino

Inspiration comes from plastic fantastic Halloween King Ben Cooper who manufactured affordable mass-produced Halloween costumes from the 1930s to the late 1980s. Costumes consisted of from vinyl character smocks and plastic masks and ranged from the classic Universal Monsters to Mr. T. The retro company is now enjoying a resurgence in today’s popular culture thanks to shows like Stranger Things and independent clothing brands such as Vixen by Michelline Pitt collaborating with their archives

Micheline Pitt Devil Skirt
Vixen by Micheline Pitt Ben Cooper Swing Skirt
Ben Cooper assorted masks
Ben Cooper masks
Moschino Resort Wear 2020
Photo: Marco Ovando / Courtesy of Moschino

Speaking of Universal Monsters,  Moschino and Universal City Studios collaborated together a small selection of garments and accessories for the collection which are now currently available on the designer’s website. And I want each and every single one.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: